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Book Love—A Blog Hop!

I love sharing good books with other readers, in person and online. But I don’t do it often enough. Thanks to Carrie Finison for the push to blog about books that I love this month!

I read about the Book Love Blog Hop on Carrie’s blog, Story Patch. I hope you’ll join me in blogging about books that you love this month.

BOOK LOVE Blog Hop Instructions:

1. Pick some books you love (any genre) that you think deserve more attention than they are getting.

2. Post reviews for the books you chose on Goodreads, or any social media. The reviews can be brief - even posting a short review helps. Posting on Amazon or Shelfari is great, too, or Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest, etc. The more places you can publicly proclaim your love, the better!

3. If you want, you can also post the reviews on your own blog, or link your blog back to your reviews on social media.

4. Feel free to display the BOOK LOVE badge on your blog - and if you want, link it back to this post so your visitors know what it's all about.

5. Tag some friends to do the same! Tag friends through their blogs, or on Facebook. That's it! If you don't want to wait to be tagged, you can jump right in and start reviewing and tagging yourself.

Here are some of the most recent books that I’ve read and loved.

THE THREE BILLY GOATS FLUFF, by Rachael Mortimer, illustrated by Liz Pichon (picture book)
Opening line: “Trip-trap. Trip-trap. How was he supposed to sleep?” The story plays on the well-know tale of the Three Billy Goats Gruff. The problem: Mr. Troll can’t sleep with the goat children trip-trapping across his bridge all the time. Kids will love how the goats end up solving the problem and make a friend in the process. Illustrations are big and colorful, adding to the experience. Scholastic 2010

DOUG UNPLUGS ON THE FARM, by Dan Yaccarino (picture book)
Opening line: “This is Doug. He’s a robot.” On the way to visit a farm, Doug’s parents plug him in so he can learn all about farm things. But when Doug gets un-plugged, he learns about a farm first hand, and picks up some things that you just can’t get any other way. Alfred A. Knopf 2014

BIG BAD WOLVES AT SCHOOL, by Stephen Krensky, illustrated by Brad Sneed (picture book)
Opening line: “Rufus was a young wolf who spent his days turning over rocks, rolling in the grass, and running like the wind.” Rufus’ parents send him to the Big Bad Wolf Academy to learn more about being wolf-like. He is not exactly the best student. In the end he saves the day just by being himself. Simon & Schuster 2007

ONE THOUSAND TRACINGS, HEALING THE WOUNDS OF WORLD WAR II, by Lita Judge (picture book)
Opening lines: “When I was three, Papa left home to join the war. When I was six, the war was over.” Written in a lovely poetic voice, this follows the true story of how one family helped to ease the suffering of many Europeans following World War II. Double spreads are captioned with titles and dates. This story is a picture of how seemingly small efforts make big differences. Hyperion Books for Children 2007

TOP SECRET FILES: THE CIVIL WAR, by Stephanie Bearce (middle grade)
Opening line, chapter 1: “Railroad baron Samuel Felton knew a terrible secret—one that could change the course of history.” If you think you don’t like history, this book will change your mind! No computers in the 1800’s? No phones? No problem! Find out how men, women, slaves and even young boys worked together for a cause that they believed in. Readers will be caught up by these true stories about people, and events that happened in the Civil War. Then they can try out their own spy skills with the activities provided throughout the book. Prufrock Press 2014

Tag, you’re it, Sue B. Edwards!

Tag, you're it, Margo Dill!

Tag, you're it, Joyce Ragland!

Ok, blog friends. I tag you! February is Valentine’s Day, but the love doesn’t have to stop there. So hop on, and share some of your favorite books!  Read More 
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Children's Thanksgiving Books

I think Thanksgiving is my favorite holiday! It’s a time for family, good food, and remembering what really matters. It’s spending time and playing games together, too. And of course the football games after dinner. After everyone pitches in to help with the dishes.

I didn’t realize that I had so many children’s Thanksgiving books on my shelf until I decided to list them on my blog this week. There’s not room for all of them, but here are a few of my favorites.

THANKS FOR THANKSGIVING, by Julie Markes, illustrated by Doris Barrette, HarperCollins 2004. Wonderful rhythm and rhyme carry you through the many things that a child is thankful for. The illustrations are from a child’s view, and the colors and detail give richness to the book as a whole. This book captured my heart, and I actually paid full price for it when I saw it.

THIS FIRST THANKSGIVING DAY, by Laura Krauss Melmed, illustrated by Mark Buehner, Harper Trophy 2001. A countdown book to Thanksgiving dinner, each scene shows a piece of an earlier time as pilgrims and Indians prepare for a special feast. It ends on a note of harmony and friendship as all join together in a prayer of thanks for all that they have that first Thanksgiving day. Once again the rich fall colors and detail add so much to the story.

‘TWAS THE NIGHT BEFORE THANKSGIVING, by author/illustrator Dav Pilkey, Scholastic 1990. A humorous story about 8 children on a field trip to a turkey farm who befriend 8 turkeys, doomed to be the main course for Thanksgiving dinner. A rescue plan is carried out and everyone enjoys a delicious vegetarian meal on Thanksgiving Day. The illustrations add to the humor, especially as the children waddle away ‘stuffed with turkey.’

THANKSGIVING IS HERE! By Diane Goode, author/illustrator, Scholastic 2003. This book celebrates family as each time the doorbell rings, more and more relatives join in. The celebration continues after dinner and on through dessert. At the end of the day everyone leaves to go home, but not to worry, because “we’ll be back!” The illustrations show a large loving family, happily enjoying being together at the holiday.

THANKSGIVING DAY AT OUR HOUSE, by Nancy White Carlstrom, illustrated by R. W. Alley, Scholastic 1999. A great collection of Thanksgiving poems starting with The Day Before, and ending with Goodnight Prayer. You’re sure to connect with the poems here, as well as with the illustrations which picture children and family the way we really are.

THIS IS THE TURKEY, by Abby Levine, illustrated by Paige Billin-Frye, albert Whitman & Co 2000. A good read-aloud with fun repetition throughout. When the turkey slips from the pan and ends up in the fish tank, the reader wonders if dinner is ruined. Grandma reassures them “…we have all we need because everyone’s here.” And Grandpa adds “No turkey? No problem! I’m hungry—let’s eat!” Illustrations compliment and add to this fun Thanksgiving story.

A few other books are:
SILLY TILLY’S THANKSGIVING DINNER, by Lillian Hoban, HarperTrophy 1991.
MINNIE AND MOO AND THE THANKSGIVING TREE, by author/illustrator Denys Cazet, DK Publishing, Inc 2000
TURKEY RIDDLES, by Katy Hall and Lisa Eisenberg, illustrated by Kristin Sorra, Puffin Books 2002

Happy Thanksgiving to All! Save room for the pie!  Read More 
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Reviews and Poetry sites

What a wonderful week-end spent in Mitchell, IN, where I met local and neighboring librarians-- including some poets!-- at the Mitchell Public Library. The friendly reception (and the afternoon tea!) were awesome. Thanks to Alexis and library staff for making it such a pleasant visit. Even the weather gave us a warm welcome :) There are some pictures from the event posted to the left of this blog.

Name That Dog!, my newest picture book of poetry for children, received some very nice reviews, which I've posted on my website under 'My Works--Name That Dog!'.

Booklist comments "T.S. Elliot’s Old Possum has his practical cats; Peggy Archer has puppies from A to Z. This picture-book poetry collection presents a rogues’ gallery of pooches in selections designed to help an unidentified dog owner name his or her new pet..." and ends by saying "A great choice for dog lovers, this will easily find a place in elementary-school language-arts classes."

Book Page included Name That Dog! in its list of new poetry books, and says "Name That Dog! is a crowd-pleasing canine chorus."

The Chicago Tribune starts out "Imagine the appeal of “The Puppy Channel” between book covers. The premise: Every puppy needs a name that’s perfect...."

I hope this book finds a place in the hearts of its readers.

Here are a few more sites to check out for poetry month!
http://gottabook.blogspot.com/
April 2010
Thirty Days, Thirty Poets
blog by Gregory K. Pincus

http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/article/CA6516981.html?rid=413491236&q=poetry
An introduction to sijo poems, an art form that originated in Korea, in this interview with Linda Sue Parks.

http://www.schoollibraryjournal.com/search/siteall?q=poetry&t=&t1=&t2=&tf=&ct=&at=
An article by Marilyn Singer, ALA Poetry Blast coordinator, on "...Making Poems a Part of Children’s Every Day Lives" gives some ideas on ways to excite children about poetry. Marilyn's new book of poetry for children, "Mirror, Mirror," was released this month.

Enjoy! And join in celebrating poetry for children this month!  Read More 
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